Missing Decals

Missing Decals

There were two small decals in the cockpit that were nearly illegible and the capacity plate is very faded. Based on what was in the info I received from Boston Whaler, I was able to reproduce all three using Photoshop. VistaPrint has car decals on a clear material so I ordered these for about $13 with shipping!

I plan on flipping the capacity plate over and polishing it before attaching the new decal.

UPDATE 8/30/2018: It took three tries with VistaPrint to get it right. The first attempt was my fault. I missed the fine print that the actual image will be resized to fit the 12 in square clear door decal even though my uploaded Adobe psd file was setup for that (see below). The printed capacity label was enlarged to 6 in. instead of 4.

For the second attempt, I created an image that filled the 12 in sheet. Six red labels and two capacity. These were closer but still too big. This time I learned that the actual image must be square or the printer will stretch the final product.

For the final attempt I made sure it was square and met their specs to the letter. VistaPrint came through! They worked with me to get a decal that is printed to scale at no extra charge. I just needed to be patient and persistent.  🙂 🙂

By the way, I always checked the proofs and printed them on my printer and they looked fine.

Hull Number Identification

Hull Number Identification

The hull number ID plate can be found at the top of the transom starboard side. The aluminum plate is printed with black ink except for the hull number, year and month that is stamped in.

My plate shows BWC6A 102M  81J.

  • BWC = Boston Whaler Corporation
  • 6A = model designator
  • 102 = hull number
  • M = model year format
  • 81 = year
  • J = month (May)
    • A = August (model year start)
    • B = September
    • C = October
    • D = November
    • E = December
    • F = January
    • G = February
    • H = March
    • i = April
    • J = May
    • K = June
    • L = July

 

Disassembled

Disassembled

Today I began removing all that I could from the boat. All of the teak and mahogany will be sanded and varnished. Everything will be scrubbed. All of the hardware will be bagged and tagged for re-installation later.

Notice the patches under the cockpit benches. I don’t believe they’re “factory” so they will not be replaced. The bottom board on the port shelf is beyond repair as well as the plywood on the sides of the tables.

My plan is to keep the boat as original as possible.

Electrical First Check

Electrical First Check

The boat didn’t come with a battery so I hadn’t given checking out the wiring much thought, until tonight. I remembered that I have a battery jump pack. I hooked it up to the battery leads and crossed my fingers. The only light that would come on was the starboard cabin light. I attempted to troubleshoot it in the dark but gave up. I have a better understanding now of how it’s wired and it looks like I need to buy fuses and bulbs to start.

Never Hurts to Ask

Several weeks ago, I emailed customer service at Boston Whaler for any information. To my surprise I received a response today with a pdf attached.

  • An OWNER’S MANUAL with parts listing with diagrams, rigging instructions, sail dimensions
  • Shop Drawings – mooring/trailering cover, bow pulpit, wood location diagram
  • A Sales Brochure
  • A Vendor’s Listing
  • An article introducing the Harpoon 6.2 from Whaler’s News, December 1979

Thanks Chuck B.!!

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